Internet Paradigm I: A Simpletons Understanding

The name Marshall McLuhen is referenced at least 10 times a lecture so you’d think that by now I would finally have understood his work and the messages that he was attempting to convey. However! If you think about it… my failure in understanding his message is what his message was all about… my own interpretation? All jokes aside here is my take on this weeks content in the form of an explanation and badly made memes because I make jokes when I am uncomfortable…

So, Network Participation and Collective Intelligence, sounds pretty official. The premise of this week was all about the different networks that exist in our world and how messages are communicated through them. Another saying that I swear I am hearing in my sleep it has been repeated so much is “A change in medium is a change in scale” which is, yet again a concept that is so open yet I am beginning to understand its importance. It is referring to the different ways that messages through technology and in our media environments.

Another important piece of information that I am portably misinterpreting is the ideology of gatekeepers in different types of networks, open and closed. In a closed network, the gatekeeper of information is done by professionals, people who are paid to filter information and then process it to the public sphere. In an open system it has completely changed both the medium (the internet) and the scale (huge audience) that information can be accessed, see I’m getting it now! The job of the gatekeeper has now fallen on bloggers and social media sites and modern software process the information and act as the barrier. This opens up the argument surrounded around the central ideology of Agenda setting theory in the media but there is no way I am opening that can of worms.

So, this week was another challenge for me, but I’m getting there. So here is a meme because, like I said before, I make bad jokes to fill silences…

References:

Rosen, Jay (2008) If Bloggers Had No Ethics Blogging Would Have Failed, But it Didn’t. So Let’s Get a
Clue.

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